Scientists have determined that magic mushrooms may help treat conditions ranging from PTSD to alcohol abuse.

A PolicyMic article points to several recent psychological studies that show psilocybin can have therapeutic benefits for people struggling to overcome fear and anxiety stemming from a variety of factors.

Researchers claim success in using psilocybin to treat migraines, depression and even death anxiety in terminal cancer patients. A 2011 Johns Hopkins study concluded that controlled use of psilocybin had long-lasting medical and spiritual benefits, with 94 percent of the test subjects reporting 14 months later that their mushroom trip was one of the five most important moments of their lives and had led to positive outcomes such as better marriages, less drinking and more empathy. Researchers say those changes in adults are atypical, since personalities are pretty set after age 25-30, and that the mushrooms may actually help map new neural pathways.

The federal government has made it almost impossible to conduct research on psychoactive drugs. In 2013, a group of psychiatrists released a review (http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v14/n8/abs/nrn3530.html) condemning government restrictions. Hopefully these scientific studies will encourage the feds to loosen their chokehold on Schedule I drugs—including psilocybin, MDMA and of course, marijuana -- for research into their practical therapeutic uses.