There is nothing that rattles the nerves of pot proponents quite like reading obscene statistics in black and white; to see evidence of hard-working American citizens continuing to struggle inside a cesspool of poverty, while state governments continue to piss away sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars busting people for weed.

Earlier this week, the American Civil Liberties Union launched a new online resource that will get your blood boiling, as it allows users to see, first hand, just how much money is being spent on enforcing marijuana laws in their state. The tool also provides insight into marijuana arrest rates and how those translate from a racial standpoint.

The Uncovery was put together using 2010 statistics from a detailed report released last year by the ACLU entitled “Billions of Dollars Wasted On Racially Biased Arrests,” which found that despite the rate of marijuana use being relatively the same in both black and white Americans, blacks were still four times more likely to be arrested for pot possession. 

The study also found that Uncle Sam spent nearly $4 billion enforcing marijuana laws in America, busting someone for a weed-related offense every 41 seconds in 2010. A mind blowing 88% of the United States’ 889,133 arrests were for possession -- that is 300,000 more than what was made for all violent crime.

In my home state of Indiana, the powers that be spent an embarrassing $38,480,904 enforcing marijuana laws in 2010, while neighboring Kentucky spent close to $20 million. However, those bastards in Illinois spent almost $222 million just trying to keep a plant from being smoked…Ridiculous.

It is worth noting that while most states continue to spend millions of dollars to keep weed off the streets this year, Colorado will generate over $100 million in tax revenue.

To find out how much money your state is pissing away supporting marijuana prohibition click here: https://theuncovery.org

Mike Adams writes for stoners and smut enthusiasts in High Times, Playboy’s The Smoking Jacket and Hustler Magazine. You can follow him on Twitter @adamssoup and on Facebook/mikeadams73.